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Foundry and Forge

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World's Shortest Module
 
Module Owner:

Frederick Monsimer
Primary Modeler:

Frederick Monsimer
Other Modelers:

Don Bell, Bob Keim, Jim Maurer, Dick Stamm, John Wertan
Construction Date:

November, 2008
First Show:

December, 2008
Greenberg's Show
Valley Forge, PA
Module Dimensions:

24 inches X 48 inches
Module Description:

Steel can be shaped through several different processes, including casting, forging, and rolling.

Each process affects the properties of the material, and the process chosen will depend on what properties the metal will need to have for its intended use.

Casting is the pouring of liquid metal into a mold. The molds used to cast iron and steel are made of a special type of sand, which holds its shape after the master part is pressed into the surface of the sand. After casting, the sand is removed, and the finished part is cleaned.

Forging is the shaping of metal under pressure - this may be done in a press, or by using a hammer to pound the material into shape. Hammers range from small hammers, held in a blacksmith’s hand, to immense drop hammers weighing several tons, powered by steam, hydraulics, or electric power, which are used to shape large forged metal parts, like side rods for steam locomotives.

Rolling is the shaping of metal between two (or more) rollers. Flat rollers will produce flat slabs or sheets of material, while shaped rollers can form other shapes, including I-beams and railroad rails.

This foundry produces a variety of cast parts, such as signs, handles, and end-of-track bumpers.
The forge, next door, produces other parts, such as railroad wheels and axles.
Some parts from the foundry and forge require further machining before they can be used for their intended purposes.
Diagram showing the general arrangement of this module.
Diagram showing the general arrangement of this module.

The foundry and forge module.
The foundry and forge module.

Iron Street crosses the tracks near the forge.
Iron Street crosses the tracks near the forge.

The foundry and forge module.
The foundry and forge module.





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This web site developed and managed by:
Frederick Monsimer